31 May 2020

Pentecost: God Dances Like a Flame Within

Today, I remember the significance of the promise Jesus made to his disciples shortly after his resurrection. It was a promise that they would receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. By the Spirit, the Church is sent to serve as Jesus served, to be a sign of hope, to reflect here and now the joy and love of the kingdom of God that shall never fade. In Acts 2, we read a record of how this new work in and through the Church was inaugurated during the Feast of Pentecost--and that good work is still continuing today. In this short video, I share the story of Acts 1 and 2 by using materials I've created to help both young and old receive the kingdom of God like little children. I hope you enjoy it.



Email subscribers: click this link to view the video onYouTube.

If you are interested in obtaining these materials for use in your church or home setting, email Troy at troy@playfull.orgtroy@playfull.org for details.

At PlayFull, we believe that play is so much more than just a form of superficial escapism. It expresses something fundamental about what it means to be human and it shapes us, both individually and as a society. To learn more about the enduring value of playfulness, keep in touch with PlayFull by liking us on Facebook, following us on Twitter, and subscribing to this blog (subscription options are located in the left sidebar).



19 May 2020

A Person of Peace




Good morning, friends. I know this may sound na├»ve and idealistic but today I just want to encourage everyone to be a person of peace. You never know who you might interact with today who is struggling with something, carrying burdens. It is possible (probable?) we will never know the story of most people we will encounter today. When we read or hear something we disagree with, it’s good to remember that we may not be getting the whole picture of what the person is trying to say, the experience out of which the person is speaking.

It is easier to misunderstand than to understand. Understanding requires reflection, listening, seeking clarification more than validation. Sometimes it means giving the other person the benefit of the doubt, seeing the best in them. Name-calling and pigeon-holing prove counterproductive to this end. No one ever felt understood via aggressive or hostile treatment; in the same vein, no one comes to understand the other when they are regarded in ways that are demeaning or belittling. “A gentle answer turns away wrath.”

We all have a limited view of others. To grow as a human being is to enlarge one’s ability to see the world through someone else’s eyes. The hardest words we may ever have to live by are these: “Judge not lest you be judged.” Sadly, it may also be true that those who have the hardest time living by these words are those who claim to follow the one who spoke them.

My own experience is one of both darkness and light. My guess is that your experience is a mixture, too. On social media, for example, I’m troubled by the many ways we demean others and are quick to judge. But I am also encouraged by the many ways I see people spreading the light, showing kindness, compassion and esteem for others. When the darkness seems to be growing, the only way to dispel it is to shine a light. Shine your light today, my friends. I will try my best to shine mine.

………………

a person of peace
reflections by troy cady
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16 May 2020

Wearing Masks


Look at me looking at you,
wearing our masks
the proper way—
eyes exposed.

When you look at me looking at you
what do you see?
Do these eyes smile,
can you see in them
the vulnerable intimacy of infancy,
the childhood joy
of hopscotch on sidewalks,
the firstfruits of spring?
Do you notice the shape
of love, trace
the line from forehead
through nose bridge,
from brow to brow?
Can you see the wonder
of a future then
cradled in present hope
right here, right now?

Look at me looking at you
as we briefly pass.
We are in this together,
wearing our masks
the proper way—
eyes open,
hearts exposed.

……………………………..

wearing masks
by troy cady
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